Adventures of Life in Beijing

Health

Typhoid & Tums

Health Precautions

Staying healthy while living in China is one of my main concerns as we prepare to move. So I logged onto the Center for Disease Control website, clicked on China, and the following helpful information came up:

  • Get vaccinated
  • Eat  and drink safely
  • Keep away from animals
  • Prevent bug bites
  • Avoid sharing bodily fluid.

Ok, I think we can manage this. To tackle the vaccines, we headed to Passport Health in Orlando, rolled up our sleeves and emptied our wallets. One hour, 9 shots, $1,925 and a stop at Chick-fil-A later, the boys and I are sufficiently armed against Japanese Encephalitis, Typhoid and Hepatitis. We decided to pass on the rabies vaccine (I thought those were for dogs?) vowing instead to duck and cover if we are attacked by a swarm of rabid bats (or rats for that matter).

Stocking the pharmacy

With the shots out of the way, I turned my attention to gathering inhalers, Epi-pens, allergy medicine and enough over the counter meds to give CVS or Walgreens a run for their money.

Stocking up on OTCs

Tums, Tylenol, Sudafed, Benadryl, cold medicine and other soothing remedies readily available in the U.S. are hard to come by in China outside of a hospital setting, as no Western-style drug stores exist. I’ll probably throw in some hand-sanitizer and sunscreen for good measure.

Face masks

And then of course there is the infamous air pollution problem. Some studies suggest that living in Beijing on a bad air quality day is the equivalent to smoking 25-40 cigarettes a day. Well, I’ve never smoked a cigarette in my life and don’t intend to start now.

So we are bringing our Vogmasks, super comfy, stylish cotton face masks that filter out the harmful particles in the air.

I have this pretty floral one, but I am thinking about ordering a few more. Don’t you think a girl should have a mask for each outfit, kind of like shoes?

Being prepared

While we are prepared enough to make any Boy Scout proud, it’s highly unlikely we will be swarmed by encephalitis-carrying mosquitoes or suffer permanent damage from a few smoggy days. More than likely our biggest risks are painful fingers from Chopstick Overuse Syndrome (COS) common to new expats and Beijing belly (gastric upset from too many stuffed buns)

Try it

Just one more…..I dare you.

Free stuff

You made it this far. Thanks for reading! What’s your go-to home remedy or OTC medicine when you are sick? I’d love to hear so I can bring it along. Comment below or send me a message. Best suggestion wins a prize (pollution mask or Pepto Bismal, your choice.)